Understanding Self Harm

May 29, 2020 | Cyber Parenting - Inappropriate Content

Self-harm is often understood to be a physical response to an emotional pain of some kind and can be very addictive.

As children’s use of the online world grows, increasing mental health issues such as self-harm are taking a different form online. Children are now actively seeking abuse online to self-harm.

If you suspect that your child is self-harming or you’d simply like more advice to stay informed on the issue, the advice hub will provide insight from our expert panel and advice on which organisations are available to give you and your child one-to-one support.

Self-harm is behaviour that is done deliberately to harm oneself. At least 10% of adolescents report having self-harmed. Self-harm can include, for example: self-cutting taking an overdose hitting or bruising intentionally taking too little or too much medication burning hanging suffocation Although some people who self-harm may be suicidal, self-harm is often used as a way of managing difficult emotions without being a suicide attempt. However, self-harming can result in accidental death.

Is your child self-harming?

As a parent, you might suspect your child is self-harming. If you are worried, watch out for these signs: Unexplained cuts, burns or bruises Keeping themselves covered; avoiding swimming or changing clothes around others Being withdrawn or isolated from friends and family Low mood, lack of interest in life or depression Blaming themselves for problems or expressing feelings of failure, uselessness, hopelessness or anger.

Source: Vodafone DP

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